How COVID-19 hit youth employment in Europe – and how it can recover

For 15 to 29-year-olds in the EU, employment fell by 2.8 percentage points over this time.

Data curated by Eurostat from July to September 2021 shows a recovery. The employment ratio amongst young people for this time is only 0.1 percentage points below where it was at the same time as the year 2019.

The countries Portugal, Bulgaria, Latvia, Czechia and Poland also experienced the biggest fall in youth employment by at least 3 percentage points between July and September 2021, compared in the same period in 2019.

The International Labour Organization (ILO) which is a United Nations agency that outlines international labour criteria says that the proportion of young people in work fell by 8.7% in 2020. by For adults, the impact was not too severe, with employment falling 3.7%

With “lockdown and other containment regulations, which were implemented in the second quarter of 2020 and legislated in most countries, the International Labour Organization said the effects of pandemic-induced economic damage were widespread. “Output in growing and developing economies is estimated to have declined by 2.2% in 2020 compared with a fall of 4.7% in advanced economies.”

The total numbers of hours which were to be dedicated to work that faded away because of COVID-19 are equal to 255 million full-time jobs being lost all over the world.

Not only have young people suffered more than adults, but young women have been hit hardest by unemployment during the pandemic.

Even though the previous worldwide pandemic lies at the heart of increased youth unemployment, there have been other multiple specific events leading to people being out of work. For instance, it may have been due to industry- or sector-wide closures effected by lockdowns. Retail and hospitality are two examples of such sectors where widespread closures ushered in a large number of lay-offs. Other individuals who worked in more marginalized forms of employment may have found that the opportunities they had to make money had dried up.

There have also been cases of many young people whose education and training was being disrupted, leaving them – in most cases – economically inactive.

Though there have been changes here and there, completely settling these scenarios requires an understanding of the intersectionality of people’s situations.

In short, the International Labour Organization has noted that one size will not fit all when it comes to planning a comeback of employment prospects for young people,

It recommends a series of policy-driven initiatives and interventions to help turn things around.

Resolving these problems requires an in-depth understanding of the intersectionality of affected individuals’ circumstances. Asides from ensuring both youth and adult employees get either the antigen covid or rapid testing to ensure they are fit for work. The following measures can be carried out:

  1. Stimulating and encouraging the creation of more jobs

Government should enable new employment and entrepreneurship by focusing on the most vulnerable young people and getting them jobs

  1. Education, Training, Re-entry programs

Young people should be empowered to study and train to fill any skills gaps that may have arisen due to disruptions during the pandemic.

They should be supported through employment services, entrepreneurship schemes, and programmes that target entry or re-entry into work for young people who have lost their jobs and are still trying to get employed,

  1. Keep young people in the formal economy

This will enable them to be less likely to seek money-making opportunities through informal activities that can work. The payment of unemployment benefits should be encouraged.

  1. Workers’ rights should be enforced

The International Labour Organization (ILO) which is a United Nations agency that outlines international labour criteria says that the proportion of young people in work fell by 8.7% in 2020. by For adults, the impact was not too severe, with employment falling 3.7%

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